PLOT NUMBER TWO
AN UNDERGRADUATE LITERARY JOURNAL

THE CHAOS OF MYTHOLOGY : Amruta Patil


But then, of course, the natural world is vanishing too. With more buildings and more greys surroundings us, this natural world itself could stop being an inspiration for anybody. Patil feels that ‘the more forests—and this is a line from Sauptik—the more forests disappear from our reality, the more they profuse and grow in our literature or our imagination. There’s more and more of this kind of almost nostalgic literature connected with the disappearing natural world that is coming about.’




Anuvaad-Vivaad : Rita Kothari


"The problem with English now is not so much that it was the language of the coloniser, but that it is the language of the elite. So, it is not some external colonisation; it is an internal colonisation. So, we have to make sure—and this is what academics don’t do—to use a language that is not obtuse and filled with jargon.’ She thinks that it can exclude people. ‘I think tum doosri bhaasha istemal karne ki baat kar rahe ho. Jo use kar rahe ho pehle usko toh saral banao. Don’t turn everything into a completely conceptual, intellectual language. You’ve got to break it every now and then. Mess it up a little bit,"





OF ROUTES AND ROOTS: Sagarika Ghosh


It is not just her characters that make Sagarika’s fiction autobiographical—her personal ideology does too. For instance, Sagarika admits to having had an “angst about being an English-speaking person in a colonial society”. Reminiscing back to ‘growing up’ during her time at Oxford, she elaborates on this colonial angst.“We were less confident about our global identity in those days,” she recalls, “much more tentative, ridden with anxieties about, you know, ‘why the hell does my mother know so much about Lady Di?!’